Próximamente...

Conferencia de la prof. Tania Láleva (1 de marzo, Madrid)

Como viene siendo habitual, al finalizar la asamblea ordinaria anual de socios tendrá lugar una conferencia de un especialista en un...

lunes, 29 de julio de 2013

Empire between Empires: Understanding Empire in the long seventh century: Session at the International Medieval Congress (IMC), Leeds, 7-10 July 2014

Much of the history of the seventh century is dominated by struggles between empires; between the Sassanians and Byzantines in the earlier years and between those two and the rising power of the Islamic caliphate later on.  One of the great empires of antiquity, the Persian, ends in this period.    
How did seventh century peoples conceptualise empire in a period where it no longer had a clear meaning?  Did universal empire retain power as a political/ideological goal?  Was the meaning of empire transformed in the period?  Was empire an aspiration among peoples of the time?  Did visions of past and future empires colour understandings of the present?
Empire between Empires: Understanding Empire in the long seventh century proposes to examine the ways in which seventh century peoples conceptualized Empire across cultures and seeks to find meaningful common points as well as divergencies between the visions of Empire in the period.   This examination will take place within the context of the 2014 IMC.
The IMC, an annual conference running continuously since 1994, is the biggest humanities event in Europe, attracting over 1800 delegates in 2013, and provides a unique forum for sharing and comparing approaches across a wealth of disciplines.

Responding to the 2014 theme ‘Empire’, Empire between Empires: Understanding Empire in the long seventh century will offer further opportunities for fruitful exchange between scholars working on concepts of imperialism, ideology, apocalyptic and historiography across a broad range of languages and cultures but within a narrow chronological period.

Proposals for papers are warmly invited from new and established researchers in the field, and topics may include:

• Imagining empire: the idea of empire in the seventh century Latin west

• Islam and Empire: the early Islamic view of Roman and Persian empires

• Empires and the End: the idea of empire in seventh century apocalyptic

• Salvaging Empire: the idea of empire and Byzantine survival

• New Empires of the Mind? The idea of empire as ideology in previously non-imperial societies (Franks, Goths, Arabs, etc)

Organised by Thomas J. MacMaster (PhD student, University of Edinburgh) under the auspices of the Seventh Century Studies Network

If you are interested in offering a 20-minute paper within this session please send a title and a brief abstract of 100 words by 1 September 2013 to Thomas J. MacMaster at empireatleeds@gmail.com 

Please note: Speakers invited cannot present a paper in another session at the IMC. All speakers will have to pay the appropriate IMC registration fee to attend.

For more information on the IMC see 
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/, and for the call for papers for the 2014 Congress, see http://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2014_call.html 

The twentieth International Medieval Congress will take place on the University of Leeds campus in Leeds from 7-10 July 2014.

martes, 2 de julio de 2013

Tres contratos predoctorales en la Universidad de Gante



The university of Ghent is advertising three PhD positions, in the field of late antique and Byzantine historiography. One PhD position is reserved for Syriac studies (below no. 3). The starting date is between 1/10/2013 and 1/1/2104.
Applicants can apply for more than one position.

Further particulars below

Prof. Dr. Peter Van Nuffelen

Department of History
Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 35, Office 120.008
9000 Ghent
Belgium

1. PhD Position Late Antique Historiography

As part of a shared research project in the departments of history of Ghent University (Belgium) and Groningen University (The Netherlands), one four-year PhD studentship is available at Ghent University. The project focuses on Greek and Latin antiquarian writing in late Antiquity and its cultural meaning in this period. The successful candidate will edit fragmentary antiquarian writers in Latin and Greek from the fourth to the sixth century.

You possess a good master’s degree in History, Classics, or a related discipline (or will possess one by 1/1/2014) and an excellent knowledge of Latin and Greek. You have an interest in historiography and literature, and are open to theoretical approaches. You are able to work independently, whilst also a team player. Your tasks include: 
- completion of a PhD within four years,
- the co-organisation of a conference,
- limited amounts of teaching,
- occasional assistance with other research carried out in the project.
Acquaintance with Byzantine studies and/or early medieval Latin constitute an advantage.

We offer you the possibility to work as part of a high-quality and large group of scholars working on late antique, early medieval and Byzantine history and literature at a leading university of Belgium, a scholarship of approx. 1600 euro (net) per month, further training in our Doctoral School, and the possibility to study one year or semester abroad (depending on additional funding).

The successful candidate is expected to start on 1 October  2013 or soon thereafter.  S/he shall have to live in Belgium.

A full project description can be obtained from Prof. Peter Van Nuffelen (peter.vannuffelen@ugent.be). Applications, consisting of a CV, personal statement (max 1 p.), description of the research you would like to carry out within the project (max. 1 p.), the names of two referees, and a copy of your MA thesis or a substantial article, should be submitted to the same e-mail address before 1 September 2013.


2. PhD position Byzantine Historiography

In the Department of History of Ghent University (Belgium), one four-year Ph studentship is available for four years (consisting of two two-year periods), as part of an ERC-funded research project on late antique historiography (A.D. 300-800). The project will a) establish a complete inventory of late ancient historiography; b) produce editions of fragmentary texts; c) study medieval compilations; and d) situate late-antique historiography in its cultural and literary context.

Your profile:
You possess a good master’s degree in Classics, History, or another relevant discipline (or will possess one by 1/1/2014) and an excellent knowledge of Greek. Acquaintance with Latin, Byzantine Greek, or oriental languages constitutes an advantage. You have an interest in historiography and literature, and their wider historical and cultural context. You are able to work independently, whilst also being a team player. Your tasks include:
- completion of a PhD within four years,
-  the co-organisation of a conference,
- limited amounts of teaching,
- occasional assistance with other research carried out in the project.

Your duties:
Besides writing a PhD on the sources and method of one of the major Byzantine chronicles, you will contribute to a database of all late antique histories, co-organise workshops and a conference, do limited amounts of teaching and administrative duties, and contribute to other research carried out within the project.

Our offer:
We offer you the possibility to work as part of a high-quality and large group of scholars working on late antique, early medieval and Byzantine history and literature at a leading university of Belgium, a scholarship of approx. 1600 euro (net) per month, full health insurance, further training in our Doctoral School, and the possibility to study one year or semester abroad (depending on additional funding).

The successful candidate is expected to start on 1/1/2014 at the latest. S/he shall have to live in Belgium.

A full project description can be obtained from Prof. Peter Van Nuffelen (peter.vannuffelen@ugent.be). Applications, consisting of a CV, personal statement (max 1 p.), description of the research you would like to carry out within the project (max. 1 p.), the names of two referees, and a copy of your MA thesis or a substantial article, should be submitted to the same e-mail address before 1 September 2013.


3. PhD position Syriac Historiography

In the Department of History of Ghent University (Belgium), one four-year Ph studentship is available for four years (consisting of two two-year periods), as part of an ERC-funded research project on late antique historiography (A.D. 300-800). The project will a) establish a complete inventory of late ancient historiography; b) produce editions of fragmentary texts; c) study medieval compilations; and d) situate late-antique historiography in its cultural and literary context.

Your profile:
You possess a good master’s degree in a relevant discipline (or will possess one by 1/1/2014) and an excellent knowledge of Syriac. 
Acquaintance with Greek, Latin, and/or other oriental languages constitutes an advantage. You have an interest in historiography and literature, and their wider historical and cultural context. You are able to work independently, whilst also being a team player. Your tasks include:
- completion of a PhD within four years,
- the co-organisation of a conference,
- limited amounts of teaching,
- occasional assistance with other research carried out in the project.

Your duties:
Besides writing a PhD on the sources and method of one of the major Syriac chronicles, you will contribute to a database of all late antique histories, co-organise workshops and a conference, do limited amounts of teaching and administrative duties, and contribute to other research carried out within the project.

Our offer:
We offer you the possibility to work as part of a high-quality and large group of scholars working on late antique, early medieval and Byzantine history and literature at a leading university of Belgium, a scholarship of approx. 1600 euro (net) per month, full health insurance, further training in our Doctoral School, and the possibility to study one year or semester abroad (depending on additional funding).

The successful candidate is expected to start on 1/1/2014 at the latest. S/he shall have to live in Belgium.

A full project description can be obtained from Prof. Peter Van Nuffelen (peter.vannuffelen@ugent.be). Applications, consisting of a CV, personal statement (max 1 p.), description of the research you would like to carry out within the project (max. 1 p.), the names of two referees, and a copy of your MA thesis or a substantial article, should be submitted to the same e-mail address before 1 September 2013.


Prof. Dr. Peter Van Nuffelen

Department of History
Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 35, Office 120.008
9000 Ghent
Belgium

lunes, 1 de julio de 2013

Call for papers: Villes en Méditerranée au Moyen Âge et à l’époque moderne



COLLOQUE INTERNATIONAL
AIX-MARSEILLE   27, 28, 29 Mars 2014
Villes en Méditerranée au Moyen Âge et à l’époque moderne
« La ville comme laboratoire des sociétés méditerranéennes »


                                   Appel à communications

Les propositions de communications doivent être adressées avant le 10 juillet 2013 par courrier électronique (malamutelisabeth@yahoo.fr). Elles doivent être accompagnées d’un résumé d’une page, à défaut duquel il ne sera pas possible de les prendre en compte. Le comité scientifique fera connaître début octobre les contributions retenues.


Argumentaire scientifique
Le titre mérite explication : il s’agit de concilier l’histoire de la Méditerranée et l’histoire des villes. On se demandera s’il y a une spécificité méditerranéenne à l’histoire des villes. La problématique se fonde sur l’articulation époque médiévale - temps moderne selon trois concepts : adaptation, transformation et/ou rupture. Elle sera présente dans les différents champs sémantiques envisagés : l’espace, les activités, l’urbanisme/l’urbanisation/, le temps, la culture. C’est encore un autre aspect d’une histoire urbaine qui a alimenté nombre d’études depuis Lewis Mumford (La Cité à travers l’histoire, Paris, Seuil 1964).

1) L’espace 
La ville est un ensemble matériel et immatériel produit par une société vivant dans un environnement particulier temporel et spatial (Les villes et le monde, Du Moyen Âge au XXe siècle, éd. M. Acerra et alii., PUR, 2011), qui implique une diversité d’expériences historiques : divergent-elles ou convergent-elles dans la longue durée ? Y a-t-il une spécificité de l’espace méditerranéen ? L’opposition Nord-Sud est-elle pertinente et se conjugue-t-elle avec l’opposition supposée Ouest-Est ?
On rappellera les trois zones de l’époque médiévale : la méditerranéenne (la civitas se perpétue), l’européenne du Nord-ouest (la civitas et le portus), la germanique et anglaise (la ville née des marchands). Ces critères, largement périmés à l’époque moderne, perdent de leur sens à l’époque médiévale entre les villes byzantines qui se transforment à partir des structures de la ville romaine et les villes musulmanes qui naissent de rien ou presque. Dans l’Occident médiéval chrétien coexistent également des types de villes et de civilisations urbaines différentes (emporia; castra). Quel fut le devenir de ces différents types urbains à l’époque moderne : y a-t-il eu adaptation à l’existant ou transformation et rupture ? Se produit-il une fracture à l’époque moderne qui serait désormais pérenne et en lien avec une relative déchéance ou marginalisation économique de l’espace méditerranéen ? Faut-il dater du XVIe siècle ce premier fossé nord-sud alors que les villes prospères ‑ Lyon, Anvers, Séville et Lisbonne ‑ prennent la place occupée jadis par Gênes ou Venise. La question débouche bien évidemment sur l’étude de leurs activités. Peut-on alors considérer qu’il y ait des réseaux spécifiques et des hiérarchies s’appuyant sur des réalités distinctes : plus économiques au Nord, encore « médiévales » au Sud  ou bien, au contraire, y eut-il perméabilité voire uniformisation ?
Il conviendra toutefois de faire intervenir un autre paramètre, politique cette fois avec l’intégration des villes à l’époque moderne dans un système politique, celui des États. Mais alors que dire des cités-États italiennes qui traversèrent époques médiévale et moderne? Que dire des villes « capitales » en Méditerranée : Rome a donné l’exemple d’une mondialisation, d’une assimilation de la ville à la civilisation, comme Constantinople-Istanbul ? Comme Cordoue? Mais ailleurs y eut-il de véritables capitales médiévales dans l’espace méditerranéen ou est-ce le prince qui fit des villes des capitales à l’époque moderne ? Concevoir des degrés de « capitalité » [Voir Les Villes capitales au Moyen Âge, 2006]. Y a-t-il une spécificité méditerranéenne dans les capitales multiples ?
Peut-on finalement distinguer une « Méditerranée urbaine » distincte d’une « Europe urbaine » ? Compte tenu de milliers d’agglomérations différentes par leurs origines, leurs formes, leurs fonctions, leur nombre d’habitants, la superficie de leur territoire infra et extra muros ? Il faudra définir des critères qui puissent en rendre compte. Si l’on considère la démographie urbaine et son évolution, en particulier les grandes villes, force est de reconnaître qu’il y en a autant au Sud qu’au Nord à l’époque moderne. Cette résistance du Sud méditerranéen urbain n’est-elle pas à souligner ? Observe-t-on des différences entre le Nord et le Sud au niveau des comportements démographiques et de la mobilité des hommes ?
Une histoire des villes renvoie à une approche géographique, morphologique, topographique, climatique qui invite à nous interroger sur les îles considérées comme villes, ce qui est une spécificité largement méditerranéenne ; ainsi, des îles de la Méditerranée orientale ont une ville de même nom : Rhodes, Samos, Kos, Corfou, etc. Les récits des voyageurs, les archives insulaires, les correspondances consulaires permettront de pointer des activités, des réseaux pour ces « îles-villes » qui connaissent nombre de continuités entre les périodes médiévale et moderne.

2) Les dimensions économiques de la ville
Plus classique cet axe n’en est pas moins essentiel dans notre questionnement, car les activités ont hiérarchisé les réseaux et structuré socialement les villes. Il s’agira d’étudier la ville comme centre d’échanges et de se demander depuis quand ces fonctions sont étroitement mêlées. Certes, si les marchés et les ports sont une permanence depuis la ville antique dans l’espace méditerranéen, des portus se greffent sur la ville à l’époque médiévale et les emporia, ces villes carrefours vers l’an 1000, sont dans l’espace méditerranéen : villes italiennes, villes musulmanes, Constantinople. Pourtant la ville médiévale n’est-elle pas définie partout à partir du XIVe siècle par sa fonction économique ? Peut-on dire alors que la spécificité de l’espace méditerranéen s’estompe ?
Une seconde approche consistera à saisir la ville à travers ses populations et ses activités : le passage des villes structurées socialement par les métiers qui réglementent les activités urbaines au Moyen Âge à leur abandon progressif à l’époque moderne (qui connaît néanmoins l’affirmation de structures professionnelles originales à l’instar des prud’homies de pêcheurs). Cette transformation tend à enlever le politique aux métiers, et à mener à une rupture dont on se demandera, à partir d’exemples précis, si elle s’est manifestée partout au même moment, selon les mêmes rythmes et les mêmes modalités, dans une conjoncture marquée par l’importance croissante du rôle de l’État à l’époque moderne, mais aussi par l’évolution sociale urbaine spécifique aux villes italiennes, espagnoles ou de la France méridionale. L’introduction des « ouvriers », résultant de l’existence des ateliers et des chantiers, n’a-t-elle pas été retardée dans le midi méditerranéen alors que la monétarisation de l’économie urbaine casse la solidarité des métiers et que l’aristocratie des métiers tend à se fermer dans nombre de places comme Venise ?
Les réseaux économiques ont-ils vraiment été bouleversés et comment ? La fin du Moyen Âge connaissait les grandes sociétés, les succursales, les facteurs et leurs correspondants comme le soulignent des études récentes (Échanges en Méditerranée médiévale, PUP, 2012). Assiste-t-on à une adaptation et à une transformation des réseaux comme on semble le percevoir à travers l’exemple de l’effacement de Venise et du rôle croissant de Marseille à l’époque moderne en direction de l’empire ottoman ? Enfin, le Moyen Âge et l’époque moderne sont marqués par la « colonisation » si l’on entend la domination économique et culturelle et pas seulement politique et militaire. Ceci invite à réfléchir sur l’intégration des villes dans un réseau d’échanges de toute nature, réseaux dont les pôles sont méditerranéens (Gênes, Venise, Cordoue au Moyen Âge, Lisbonne, Séville à l’époque moderne) : mais on doit se demander si justement la colonisation n’a pas dans un premier (temps ????) défavorisé l’espace méditerranéen car elle était tournée vers l’Atlantique.
3) Le champ urbanistique : ville musulmane, ville byzantine, ville du monde latin
Aborder les espaces urbains fonctionnels conduira à étudier dans l’espace méditerranéen les liens entre les lieux de la puissance publique et les villes qui les accueillent. Les exemples de Kairouan et du Caire appellent à se demander si la scission entre la ville marchande et la ville politique est toujours de mise pour la ville musulmane à l’époque moderne ? Par ailleurs, malgré leur intégration dans l’État monarchique Grenade, Séville, Malaga et Cordoue ‑ qui se signalaient par leurs conurbations ‑ ont-elles conservé un « paysage distinct »  des autres villes d’Espagne ? De la même façon les villes italiennes à l’époque moderne s’adaptent-elles à l’urbanisme médiéval ? Les exemples italiens de Venise, Gênes et des villes de condottiere amènent à voir si le transfert de l’espace palatial hors du cœur de la cité vers la périphérie, du centre vers les murailles, s’est perpétué au long de la période moderne en croisant pour cela les lectures archéologique et urbanistique avec les lectures idéologique et politique. Assiste-t-on à l’émergence d’un nouvel ordre urbain, à une rupture de l’héritage ?
Le tissu urbain, réorganisé par le réseau des églises au Moyen Âge, subsiste-t-il à l’époque moderne dans l’espace méditerranéen et est-il différent ce celui du reste de l’Europe ? Dans les zones méditerranéennes chrétiennes, les citadelles médiévales constituent un réseau de forteresses, centres de la vie militaire. Si la ville médiévale, qui se ferme par une enceinte, a rompu avec la ville antique ouverte, la ville moderne en détruisant l’enceinte rompt avec la ville médiévale : est-ce pour autant un éternel recommencement, une rupture brutale ou bien la ville moderne naît de la citadelle médiévale ? La ville médiévale, qui se « réurbanise » par l’extension de faubourgs suburbains, ne préfigure-t-elle pas la ville moderne ? Toute l’Europe enregistre une croissance urbaine, et dans la zone romanisée, les antiques civitates débordent de leurs murailles, mais est-ce exactement selon le même processus qu’ailleurs ?
Les formes d’urbanisme sont également renouvelées par l’évolution des rapports sociaux : la différenciation sociale, l’appartenance ethnique, la nature des métiers, les parentèles, la religion, l’exclusion façonnent-elles des quartiers spécifiques dont les caractères sont renforcés à l’époque moderne ? Par ailleurs, à des degrés divers et selon des chronologies différentes, l’espace urbain connaît à l’époque moderne des améliorations qui visent à assainir les rues, à améliorer la qualité des eaux, à assurer l’évacuation des eaux usées (constructions d’égouts), à lutter contre les risques (incendies, épidémies) : il faudra étudier comment ces objectifs laissent leurs marques dans le tissu urbain.

4) Le temps ou « les temps »
Peut-on parler de sédimentations urbaines ? La ville antique constitue-t-elle une première strate du développement urbain ? Il faudra examiner comment la forme de l’habitat transmise de l’époque antique au Moyen Âge se retrouve aux temps modernes qui apportent toutefois nombre de variantes, d’adaptation et voir si les édifices liés aux loisirs (gymnases, théâtres) comme les marchés appartiennent à un « patrimoine méditerranéen urbain » et quel fut le rôle du Moyen Âge : un temps de rétraction urbaine uniquement et partout ? Et alors que dire de la ville musulmane ? Est-ce que la ville moderne a renoué dans tout l’espace méditerranéen avec la ville antique ouverte?
Le temps politique et le temps religieux n’offrent pas de continuité de la ville médiévale avec la cité gréco-romaine. Il n’y a pas davantage de continuité entre la ville moderne et la ville médiévale au niveau politique. On connaît le rôle « politique » des villes au Moyen Âge. Il faudra souligner comment il glisse progressivement entre les mains des États modernes et quelles furent les grandes étapes. On rappellera notamment l’ascension des juristes qui se prolonge en partie à l’époque moderne alors que les villes sont intégrées dans un système politique, celui des États. Mais n’existe-t-il pas des contre exemples ? Constantinople a-t-elle connu une période médiévale ? Les biographies urbaines montrent qu’il n’y a pas « une réalité urbaine » mais plusieurs types de villes qui ont plus ou moins connu l’accumulation des « temps » antique, médiéval pour aboutir à l’époque moderne. La ville moderne qui succède à la ville musulmane de l’Espagne du sud a- t-elle grand chose à voir avec celle qui succède aux castra ? Et celle qui prend la suite du Quattrocento avec Londres ou Paris ? Transformation ici, rupture là. De même, la ville moderne ne reprend-elle pas les apports médiévaux, voire plus anciens, en les adaptant, en les transformant ? Il n’y a pas continuité, mais héritage.
Des permanences peuvent être pourtant pointées à travers le choix du site ; il en est de même des rythmes urbains (temps hebdomadaires, annuels, civiques, festifs, laborieux, religieux) et des « nouvelles formes de sociabilités » (académies, cercles, loges maçonniques, confréries, théâtre). Mais là se pose une autre confrontation, à savoir celle de la ville musulmane avec la ville chrétienne. Ont-elles quelque chose de commun ? Ne doit-on pas alors penser, encore plus qu’ailleurs, en termes d’héritage ? Ne faut-il pas distinguer les aires musulmanes qui s’européanisent dans l’empire ottoman comme c’est le cas avec Salonique à l’époque moderne et la multiplication des écoles. L’influence et le poids de la communauté juive expulsée d’Espagne, ceux des marchands occidentaux ‑ Vénitiens puis Marseillais ‑ participent également à ce mouvement.
Les articulations entre la période médiévale et l’époque moderne sont-elles distinctes dans l’espace méditerranéen ? Le passage de la commune urbaine médiévale à la ville moderne peut être pour cela un excellent terrain d’observation. Cette émancipation s’est accompagnée d’une culture politique et de l’exercice du pouvoir par la « bourgeoisie ». Aussi, une réflexion s’impose : dans quelle mesure l’impulsion a-t-elle été donnée par les villes du Sud ? Quand a eu lieu la rupture de l’époque moderne, si rupture il y a eu, c’est-à-dire changement brutal et soudain ? Qu’est-il resté en héritage dans la représentation que la ville avait d’elle-même à l’époque moderne ? Un patriotisme ? Une mémoire des lieux ?
La mémoire des lieux occupe une place importante dans l’espace urbain. Il faudra examiner comment les acteurs sociaux et politiques ont retraduit dans les discours les anciennes chroniques urbaines, ont capté leur héritage et l’ont parfois instrumentalisé pour le mettre au service d’ambitions collectives ou individuelles. L’histoire plus ou moins mythique des origines de la cité, avec célébration et rituels civiques, peut favoriser la cohésion du groupe ou asseoir la domination de quelques-uns.


Les interventions se répartiront dans les quatre axes énumérés :
Axe 1 : L’espace
Axe 2 : Les dimensions économiques de la ville
Axe 3 : Le champ urbanistique: ville musulmane, ville byzantine, ville du monde latin
Axe 4 : Le temps ou « les temps » des villes


            Le comité scientifique du colloque est composé de :

Thierry Allain (Université Paul-Valéry - Montpellier 3)
Anne Brogini (Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis)
Gilbert Buti (Université d’Aix-Marseille)
Noel Coulet (Université d’Aix-Marseille)
Stéphane Durand (Université d’Avignon et pays du Vaucluse)
Lucien Faggion  (Université d’Aix-Marseille)
Antoine-Marie Graziani (Université Pascal-Paoli)
Philippe Jansen (Université de Nice- Sophia Antipolis)
Wolgang Kaiser (Université Paris I - EHESS)
Élisabeth Malamut (Université d’Aix-Marseille)
Brigitte Marin (Université d’Aix-Marseille)
Paolo Odorico (EHESS)
Mohamed Ouerfelli (Université d’Aix-Marseille)
Christophe Picard (Université Paris I)
Olivier Raveux (Université d’Aix-Marseille)